If you’ve ever had a really stressful month or you’ve been doing some serious travelling (which your body perceives as “stress” because it is a stray from your normal routine), you might have experienced your period coming a little early, a little late – or not even coming at all.

Of course eliminating all stress is nearly impossible, but too much can definitely take a toll on our overall health.

It is important to know that stress can be anything from emotional, mental or physical.

When our body is overloaded with stress, it can result in our immune system becoming weakened, our adrenals and thyroid becoming suppressed, our digestive system being thrown off, inflammation increasing and even increased oil production (hello hormonal acne).

Of course, this means our reproductive system can also be affected. This can result in changes in the duration of your menstrual period, and there’s even a chance your menstrual period can temporarily stop (aka amenorrhea).

If you have been dealing with amenorrhea for more than a few months, I highly recommend getting your hormone levels tested as it could be a symptom of something more serious than just “stress”.

Either way – Reducing overall stress and balancing your cortisol levels can help your body become more balanced.

How can you re-establish balance with your cortisol levels?

  1. Choose the right type of exercise for an optimal hormonal response.
  2. Avoid eating foods that your body may be allergic or intolerant to.
  3. Ensure you are getting adequate sleep.
  4. Establish a healthy daily routine and stick to it as closely as possible.
  5. Make time for self-care EVERYDAY, even if it is just 5 minutes.
  6. Consume a diet of whole nutrient dense foods (rich in lean proteins, healthy fats, antioxidant rich fruits and vegetables) as this will help reduce inflammation and counteract the negative effects of stress.
  7. Avoid/limit caffeine and alcohol, as these can just add to your overall stress load
  8. Supplement with adaptogenic herbs

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